Tombstone Tuesday: Valentine’s Edition

Note: Instead of posting this yesterday on actual Valentine’s Day I forgot and spent it with my husband. So, here is Tombstone Tuesday…ehh…I’ll have to call it 
Waiting to Find the Dead Wednesday.

It’s not every year that Tombstone Tuesday falls on a holiday and even rarer that it falls on a holiday that is all about love. Genealogy and family history in many senses is all about love. We meet, we fall in love, we have children. Time after time and again and again.

This week, I’ve decided to focus this edition of Tombstone Tuesday on gravestones that I’ve encountered that have a couple buried together or side-by-side.  All of these gravestones were taken from Bayview Cemetery in Bellingham, Washington. You can see more of my cemetery photography work at my Find a Grave profile located here. If you ever need a photo of an ancestors tombstone, be sure to message me!

Margaret and George Herley

Margaret and George Herley

Hanna and Ivar Amble

Hanna and Ivar Amble

John and Elizabeth Benthien

John and Elizabeth Benthien

Arnold and Bernice Loober

Arnold and Bernice Loober

Samuel and Natalie Franzke

Samuel and Natalie Franzke

What are your favorite “couples” gravestones or tombstones? Share in the comments below!

 


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Tombstone Tuesday: Females First

Every single week here at The Hipster Historian we follow the blog prompt Tombstone Tuesday (originating from Genabloggers) and we’ve really enjoyed it — see the past two weeks here and here.

Why females? Most of the time when you find headstones, it tends to downplay the significance of the females in these worlds until very recently. In the past, female-identified individuals either shared a stone or plot with their spouse or family (if they were unmarried) and didn’t have one of their own.  The first one we will start out with today is the marker for my late Grandmother’s grave. She now has a headstone but I haven’t had a chance to go check it out.

Donna Mae Erickson

Donna Mae EricksonToday I’ve decided to focus on graves of women that I have encountered over the years. These are some of my favorites.

Elyse Christine Alper

Elyse Christine Alper

Katie Ritchie Wilson

Katie Ritchie Wilson

The next photo is my favorite because it has a particular symbol that you don’t see very often on gravestones. If anyone can identify the symbol, please leave a comment below!

Mary Ellen Ansel

Mary Ellen Ansel

Whether it be the designs, names or people, gravestones will always fascinate us as they are the last communication from the dead to us as genealogists. What are you favorite gravestones with female names? Share a link in the comments below!

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Tombstone Tuesday: Military (US) Edition

Tombstone Tuesday has quickly become my favorite genealogy prompt from the Geneablogger with Thomas MacAntee. Last week it was the first edition. I’m a sucker for cemeteries (I have well over 500+ photos of gravestones on my hard drive right now). Each week of Tombstone TuesdayI’m going to feature different stories, ideas or facts about cemeteries, tombstones and anything related to the field of death and burial.

grvestones

Evergreen Washelli Columbarium

Military tombstones and graves are quite unique among gravestones in general. They typically have a uniform look that is the same in almost any cemetery that you will visit. There are three types of headstones and markers available — the upright headstones, the markers, and the medallions.

John Peter Watson

While I did share the above picture in the last Tombstone Tuesday, I just love the visual representation of the winter ice on this picture. This was John Peter Watson,  born in 1895 in Minnesota and died at the age of forty-one in Bellingham, Washington.  This is an example of an upright marble headstone. These measurements are uniform 42-inches long, 13-inches wide and 4-inches thick. The stones are about 230 pounds or 104 kilograms (according to the US Department of Veterans Affairs) There may be variations in the stone color, but in general, all the stones are going to look the same.

These following gravestones are all of the upright marble headstones:

Dr. William Huey

Dr. William Huey

Thomothy Paul Walton

Thomothy Paul Walton

William Loyd Hubka

William Loyd Hubka

The next type of military marker you are going to find is the flat-type marker. These have become more common over the years as marble has fallen out of style. These markers are bronze and are 24 inches long, 12 inches wide, with 3/4 raise and weigh about 18 pounds or 8 kilograms. These are most commonly seen in cemeteries since the late 60’s and 70’s.

 

Olaf G. Overrein

Olaf G. Iverrein, flat marker

Because the markers are bronze, they can oxide and turn bright teal and aquamarine like Max M. Jenkins below.

Max M. Jenkins

The last kind of gravestone or marker for members of the military is a medallion. You’ll rarely see these on individual gravestones. They are typically located near a selection of military gravestones like this one in Bayview Cemetery.

United States Merchant Marine

What other military markers have you seen? Thank you to Life After Death Photography for lending their photos to this post. Be sure to follow us on Facebook here to keep up with the latest blog posts.

Tombstone Tuesday: First Edition

I was so excited to see the Tombstone Tuesday writing prompt from GeneaBloggers and have decided to make it a permanent feature here at The Hipster Historian. Why? I love cemeteries. I visit one at least once a week and try to take as many pictures as I can both for photography practice (see here) and to help upload to one of the biggest gravestone photo repositories on the web — Find A Grave.

Today’s post will be about the different types of tombstones I’ve seen in my travels and trips to the cemeteries I’ve been too. Most of these photos come from my local cemetery, Bayview with the exception of the last photo taken at Mills and Mills Memorial Park in Tumwater, Washington.

John Peter Watson

John Peter Watson

Henry Roeder

Henry Roeder

Bayview Cemetery

Bayview Cemetery 2


Donna Mae Erickson 

What is your favorite cemetery or type of tombstone. Be sure to let us know in the comments below or on our Facebook page at The Hipster Historian.